Model Systems

SMHI Hydrological Research has so far set up the HYPE model for Sweden, Europe, the La Plata Basin in South America, the Niger River in West Africa, the Arctic Ocean drainage basin, the Arab world (Middle East / North Africa) and India.

World of HYPE

SMHI Hydrological research has so far set up the HYPE model for Sweden, Europe, the La Plata basin in South America, the Niger River in West Africa , the Arctic drainage basin, the Arab world ( Middle East / North Africa) and India.

The model systems are used in several types of issues in applied research and to test scientific hypotheses. They calculate water availability and statistics for various hydrological variables as average runoff, extremely high or low flows, groundwater variation, snow conditions, soil moisture, and in some cases water quality.

The model systems calculate time series of daily values ​​for historical periods and for future climate projections. For Sweden and Europe are also daily forecasts for the next 10 days produced. 

The different model systems differ in terms of spatial resolution, historical reference period, uncertainties and applications. The model systems are under continuous improvement within each domain and issued in the new updated versions continually.
 

SWEDEN

S-HYPE, a model of both hydrological and nutrient variables for all of Sweden. Developed to support decision making for the Water Framework Directive in Sweden. 

- S-HYPE covers 484 000 km2 and has an average resolution of 13 km2.
- Historical reference period: 1961-2013
- Number of stations with the observed discharge: 401
- Number of stations with observed water quality: 867

- S-HYPE is operational and deliver daily forecasts for the next 10 days.
 
 

BALTIC SEA

BALT-HYPE, a model of both hydrological and nutrient variables for the Baltic Sea basin.

- Balt-HYPE covers 1.8 million km2 and has an average resolution of 350 km2.
- Historical reference period: 1971-2008
- Number of stations with the observed discharge: 156
- Number of stations with observed water quality: 20 
 

EUROPE

E-HYPE, a pan-European model of hydrological variables including runoff and discharge as well as nutrients.
 
- E-HYPE covers 8.8 million km2 and has an average resolution of 215 km2.
- Historical reference period: 1981-2013
- Number of stations with the observed discharge: 181 (1007 available)
- Number of stations with observed water quality: 40
 
- E-HYPE is operational and deliver daily forecasts for the next 10 days.
 
 

NIGER RIVER

NIGER-HYPE, a model of the Niger River in Africa, simulating hydrological variables, has been developed during 2012 - 2013. 
 
- Niger-HYPE covers 2.1 million km2 and has an average resolution of 2619 km2.
- Historical reference period: 1979-2009
- Number of stations with the observed discharge: 56
 

ARCTIC OCEAN

ARCTIC-HYPE, a model for the entire Arctic Region (defined here as all land areas with runoff to the Arctic Ocean), simulating hydrological variables, has been developed during 2012-2013.

- The Arctic HYPE covers 23 million km2 and has an average resolution of 700 km2.
- Historical reference period: 1979-2009 (first version also 1961-2009)
- Number of stations with the observed discharge: 94 river mouth stations (1349 across the region)
 

INDIA

In-HYPE has been set-up during 2013 for the Indian region for calculations of hydrological variables.

- In-HYPE covers 4.9 million km2 and has an average resolution of 810 km2.
- Historical reference period: 1976-2005
- Number of stations with the observed discharge: 43
 

ARAB REGION

MENA-HYPE (Middle East and Northern Africa) has been developed during 2013.
 
- MENA-HYPE covers 20 million km2 and has an average resolution of 649 km2.
- Historical reference period: 1979-2009
- Number of stations with the observed discharge: 100
 

LA PLATA BASIN

LPB-HYPE, is a model of the La Plata Basin in South America, simulating hydrological variables.
 
- LPB HYPE covers 3.1 million km2 and has an average resolution of 500 km2.
- Historical reference period: 1975-2000
- Number of stations with the observed discharge: 68